Proceedings of the 61stAnnual Meeting of the
Acadian Entomological Society
in conjunction with the
Maine Entomological Society

August 22-24, 2002 at
The University of P.E.I., Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Agenda

Wednesday August 22nd, 2001

7:30-9:30pm Registration & Wine and Cheese Mixer - Rodd Royalty Inn, Charlottetown

Thursday August 23rd, 2001

8:30 am Registration - Duffy Science Building, UPEI

8:55am Welcome and Introductions

9:00am Keynote Address: Dr. Robbin Lindsay, Health Canada

"Vector-borne diseases in Atlantic Canada"

10:00 - 10:30 Break

FOREST ENTOMOLOGY SECTION:

10:30 - 10:45 Effect of prescribed burn on the abundance and species composition of Carabidae in a balsam fir forest of Western Newfoundland. R. Feng, D. Wells, W. Bowers and M. Mann; Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service - Atlantic, Corner Brook, Newfoundland

10:45-11:00 Impact of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, on eastern hemlock, Tsuga Canadensis (L.), in the northeastern USA. Bradley Onken and Dennis Souto, USDA Forest Service PO Box 640, Durham, NH 03824

11:00-11:15 The long distance spread into Maine of Hemlock woolly Adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, on easter hemlock Tsuga Canadensis (L), nursery stock. Don Oullette, Insect and Disease Laboratory, 50 Hospital St. Augusta, Me, 04330.

11:15-11:30 Lethal and sublethal effects of neem on balsam fir sawfly (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae) Shiyou Li, Canadian Forest Service, PO Box 960, University Drive, Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Canada A2H 6J3

11:30-11:45 Heat Treatment as a Phytosanitary Measure for Wood Infested with Brown Spruce Longhorned Beetle Lisa Mushrow, Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management, UNB - Student Presentation

11:45-12:00 Influence of Plant Module Size on the Abundance and Performance of two Gall Midges Helene Syndique, Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management, UNB - Student Presentation

12:00-1:30pm Lunch (on your own)

CROP PROTECTION ENTOMOLOGY SECTION:

1:30 - 1:45 Role of the antennae, elytra and legs of the Colorado potato beetle during flight take-off. G. Boiteau, AAFC- Fredericton Potato Research Centre.

1:45 - 2:00 Last Call® 'bait and kill' as an alternative to conventional pesticides in managing codling moth (Cydia pomonella, (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) populations in apple orchards. Rob F. Smith, Lynn Meyers and Michelle Larsen, Atlantic Food & Horticulture Research Centre, 32 Main Street, Kentville, N.S., B4N 1J5, 902-679-5730, email: SmithR@em.agr.ca

2:00 - 2:15 The Bees of Nova Scotia - Part A Cory S. Sheffield, AAFC - Kentville - Student Presentation

2:15 - 2:30 The Bees of Nova Scotia - Part B Dick Rogers, Wildwood Labs, Kentville, NS

2:30 - 2:45pm The Chemical nature of the Resistance to the Colorado Potato Beetle of Wild Solanum Species - Preliminary Results. Y. Pelletier, C.L. Clark, J. Embleton, and R. King, AAFC - Fredericton

2:45 - 3:00 Break

GENERAL ECOLOGY SECTION:

3:00 - 3:15 Evaluating the Ramp Pitfall Trap Sue Rigby, AAFC - Kentville, NS

3:15 - 3:30 Comparison of different methods of flow measurement used to characterize stream insect habitat. Eedy, R. and D.Giberson, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI C1A 4P3 - Student Presentation

3:30 - 3:45 Stress monitoring in streams: genetic responses of black fly larvae as biological indicators Purcell, L., D. Giberson, and L. Hale, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI C1A 4P3 - Student Presentation

3:45 - 4:00 Discovery of a salt marsh caddisfly in PEI salt marshes. D. Giberson, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI C1A 4P3

7:00- 9:00pm Awards Banquet held at the Brackley Northwinds Motel, Brackley Beach, PEI. (15 minute drive from Charlottetown, transportation can be arranged)

Friday August 24th, 2001

9:00 - 9:30am Provincial/State Pest Updates
9:30-10:30am Business Meeting and Adjournment

ABSTRACTS:

Paper Presentations at the 61st Annual Meeting of the Acadian Entomological Society, August 22nd - 24th, 2001.

Vector-borne disease threats in Atlantic Canada

L. Robbin Lindsay Zoonotic Diseases and Special Pathogens, National Microbiology Laboratory, Health Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Two groups of arthropods, ticks and mosquitoes, are responsible for transmission of most vector-borne disease agents in Canada. Tick transmitted human (or animal) pathogens include the agents of: Lyme borreliosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted fever, relapsing fever, Powassan encephalitis virus, Q fever, and tularemia. In addition, emerging pathogens such as the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) may also be transmitted by ticks in Canada. In general, tick transmitted diseases are relatively rare in Canada, and the risk of exposure appears to be low, due in part, to the limited distribution of established populations of the principal tick vectors. An overview of the biology, life history, and distribution of the blacklegged tick,

Ixodes scapularis, as well as the prevalence of the agents of Lyme borreliosis and HGE in ticks collected by active and passive surveillance throughout Canada, will be provided to exemplify this point. A total of 74 species of mosquitoes have been reported from Canada and human (or animal) cases of mosquito-borne diseases like western equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis (SLE), and eastern equine encephalitis have occurred infrequently in Canada. Recently, West Nile (WN) virus, a flavivirus similar to SLE virus, was discovered for the first time in the western hemisphere, in parts of northeastern United States. An overview of the surveillance program to detect WN virus in Canada and the results of mosquito surveillance studies conducted in central and eastern Canada during 2000 will be provided. Although the objectives and methodology used to conduct the mosquito surveillance studies varied somewhat among provinces, they revealed that the principal enzootic vectors for WN virus as well as many of the "bridging vectors" (i.e., ones capable of transmitting this virus to humans or other animals) are widely distributed and locally abundant in most regions sampled. Thus should WN virus be introduced into Canada, virus amplification and possible spill-over into human populations could occur. Ways to improve current field-based surveillance systems will be suggested and some of the inherent problems associated with conducting mosquito-borne disease surveillance (and control programs) will be highlighted.

Forest Entomology Section:

Effect of prescribed burn on the abundance and species composition of Carabidae in a balsam fir forest of Western Newfoundland. R. Feng, D. Wells, W. Bowers and M. Mann; Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service - Atlantic, Corner Brook, Newfoundland

Ground-occurring arthropods were sampled over 2 years using pitfall traps from prescribed burn plots and control plots of a balsam fir forest in Western Newfoundland. The effect of prescribed burn on ground beetles was analysed. Our preliminary data analysis indicated that the species eveness and abundance of ground beetles were affected by prescribed burn. Some ground beetle species were more abundant in burned plots than in controls, while other species are more abundant in controls.

Impact of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, on eastern hemlock, Tsuga Canadensis (L.), in the northeastern USA. Bradley Onken and Dennis Souto, USDA Forest Service PO Box 640,Durham, NH 03824

The long distance spread into Maine of Hemlock woolly Adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, on easter hemlock Tsuga Canadensis (L), nursery stock.

Don Oullette, Insect and Disease Laboratory, 50 Hospital St. Augusta, Me, 04330.

The state of Maine considers hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, to be a threat to its native eastern hemlock resource and established an external quarantine against this introduced pest in 1988 to prevent its entry into the state. Hemlock is used for construction lumber and pulp, accounts for 9% of the softwood inventory and an overall annual forest product consumption of 10% in Maine. The species is also commonly used in landscape plantings. Prior to 2000, much of hemlock nursery stock sold in Maine nursery and garden centers was shipped under phytosanitary certification from areas infested with hemlock woolly adelgid. The quarantine regulations were revised in 2000 to prohibit the shipment of all hemlock nursery stock into Maine from regulated areas.

In 1999 a shipment of uncertified trees from Connecticut with HWA infested trees was received and sold from two nursery garden centers in York and Camden, Maine. Pest alerts, and public announcements were employed to seek help in locating infested trees. All sites of planted hemlock nursery trees from infested shipments were treated with horticultural oil plus Talstar; infested trees were destroyed; and sites were scheduled to be watched for signs of HWA infestations for a period of 5 years.

Planting sites with infested nursery stock from shipments other than the 1999 lot were also found and treated during 2000 and 2001. Infestations occurred on planted stock only. A total of 154 infested or unsold hemlocks were found and destroyed during the 1999 - 2001 period. Over 65 residential sites with hemlocks from infested shipments are being monitored and checked annually for signs of hemlock woolly adelgid.

Lethal and sublethal effects of neem on balsam fir sawfly (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae) Shiyou Li, Canadian Forest Service, PO Box 960, University Drive, Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Canada A2H 6J3

Lethal and sublethal effects of Neemix 4.5 EC, a commercial neem preparation, on balsam fir sawfly, Neodiprion abietis (Harris) were determined in the laboratory. The results indicated that larval mortality of N. abietis increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Lethal time decreased with an increase of neem concentration. In terms of LC50, toxicity of Neemix to the sawfly is comparable to that of Dylox 420 EC, an organophosphate insecticide that is very toxic to N. abietis. The results also revealed that younger larvae are more susceptible to neem than older instars.

Neemix 4.5 EC at high concentrations showed some repellency to N. abietis larvae, but not at low concentrations. The strong antifeedant effects of neem on N. abietis larvae were evidenced by significant reduction of frass production. Larvae fed on neem-treated foliage with 90 ppm AZA produced only 16% of the frass, compared with those produced by larvae fed on water-treated foliage. Sublethal doses of Neemix 4.5 EC retarded larval and pupal development, significantly reduced pupal weight and adult emergence rate. The sex ratio of N. abietis adults seemed not to be affected by sublethal doses of neem. The author also discussed the strategies of using neem-based insecticides to control this sawfly in the forests.

Heat treatment as a Phytosanitary Measure for Wood Infested with Brown Spruce Longhorned Beetle.

Lisa Mushrow, Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management, UNB - student presentation, Andrew Morrison, Dan Quiring, Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management, UNB Fredericton, and Jon Sweeney, Canadian Forest Service

The Brown Spruce Longhorn Beetle, Tetropium fuscum (Fabr.), was recently discovered in Point Pleasant Park in Halifax, Nova Scotia and was given exotic pest status. We examined the use of heat treatment as a phytosanitary measure to eradicate T. fuscum from infested wood. Cerambycid larvae, pupae, and adults were obtained from slabs and bolts of infested logs collected at Point Pleasant Park in spring 2001. The three life stages were placed in blocks of spruce and heated for different combinations of temperature and time. Larvae were the most difficult to kill, followed by pupae and adults. Larvae died when subjected to 50 for 30 minutes or to 55 for 5 minutes.

Influence of Plant Module Size on the Abundance and Perfomance of two Gall Midges
Helene Syndique, Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Managment, UNB - student presentation, Melissa Bosse, and Dan Quiring, Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management, UNB, Fredericton

We carried out a field study to examine the influence of leaf size on the abundance and performance of Harmandia cavernosa and H. tremulae (Cecidomyiidae). Our results will be used to test predictions from the plant vigour, plant stress and the plant parabolic fitness hypotheses.

Crop Protection Entomology Section:

Role of the antennae, elytra and legs of the Colorado potato beetle during flight take-off. G. Boiteau, AAFC- Fredericton Potato Research Centre.

A series of descriptive and experimental tests carried out in a walk-in flight chamber provided new information on the flight take-off behavior of the Colorado potato beetle. Five main conclusions were reached:

* The flight take-off and lift off are strongly sequenced.

* The sensors on the antennae are important not only during flight but also at take-off.

* The elytra are a necessary foil for lift-off and have a wingbeat.

* The rising of the pro and meso thoracic legs probably free thoracic space for muscles but also partially control lift-off angle and height of flight.

* The tarsal reflex does not induce wing movement in this species but tarsal contact during flight interrupts it.

Last Call® 'bait and kill' as an alternative to conventional pesticides in managing codling moth (Cydia pomonella, (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) populations in apple orchards. Rob F. Smith, Lynn Meyers and Michelle Larsen, Atlantic Food & Horticulture Research Centre, 32 Main Street, Kentville, N.S., B4N 1J5, 902-679-5730, email: SmithR@em.agr.ca

Cash operating costs of $7,000.00 per hectare are required to produce quality apples that meet the market place expectations of quality flavour and blemish free appearance. With average yields of 1500 bushel per hectare pesticides alone account for 10-15% of production costs ($1140.00/ha). 60-75% of all insecticides used are organophosphates, a family of product that is under close scrutiny regarding toxicity to humans and negative impacts on the environment. Codling moth is consistently ranked in the top three key pests requiring 60-87% of Annapolis Valley orchardists to apply control measures; traditionally there has been but one generation until recent years when because of increase heat units a partial second generation has occurred, further complicating pest management. Despite reliable sex pheromone based monitoring traps and sound degree day predictive models timing sprays, this pest accounted for 1.25% & 1.68% in 2000 and 2001, respectively. This represents an average annual loss of nearly $250,000.

Mating disruption and 'bait & kill' offer alternatives to conventional pesticide sprays. The former has current registration with the Canadian Pest Management Regulatory Agency, Health Canada. Last Call® 'bait & kill' (6% permethrin & 0.16% sex pheromone) has USA registration and in pending registration in Canada. Two years of extensive trials in the Maritimes has demonstrated the utility of this product, particularly in well managed orchards where tree height is < 3m and application from the ground is time efficient (i.e. does not require the use of a pole applicator device).

An average application rate of 3000 droplets per hectare required 3-5 hours of labour. In 2000 crop loss in 20 blocks treated with Last Call® was ca. 0.5% while 30 Nova Scotia orchards in 2001 averaged 0.55% codling moth damage. These results equalled or were less than orchards treated with Guthion 50WP (0.03% loss) or Imidan 50WP (4.43% loss); unsprayed blocks had 8-9% fruit loss. There were no differences in damage between treatments of 3000 or 6000 droplets/ha. In 2001 some blocks experienced higher damage in border rows, a consequence of gravid females migrating into the orchards from nearby abandoned or unsprayed host trees. Last Call® worked well in orchards that had previous year codling moth damage < 1%; product & labour were competitive with conventional pesticide applications, while depositing no active ingredient on the fruit.

We acknowledge the following project participants: IPM Technologies Canada Ltd., Nova Scotia Fruit Growers Association, Prince Edward Island Apple Growers Association, New Brunswick Fruit Growers Association, Dick Rogers owner/operator of Wildwood Labs , Evans Estabrooks & Associates, Garth Nickerson, Rachael Cassie & Rachael Cheverie.

The Chemical nature of the Resistance to the Colorado Potato Beetle of Wild Solanum Species - Preliminary Results.Y. Pelletier, C.L. Clark*, J. Embleton, and R.R. King Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Potato Research Centre, P.O. Box 20280, Fredericton, NB, E3B 4Z7

Wild tuber-bearing Solanum species are a source of insect resistance. Use of insect resistant plants reduces the use of insecticides and is compatible with environmentally friendly means of insect control such as Integrated Pest Management and the use of natural enemies. Several wild Solanum species are resistant to the Colorado potato beetle (CPB), Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say). The species being worked with at the Potato Research Centre are S. capsicibaccatum, S. okadae, S. oplocense, S. pinnatisectum, S. polyadenium, S. tarijense and S. trifidum.

Before the chemical nature of resistance was investigated for these 7 wild species, several years of field and laboratory studies were performed. These included evaluation of heritability of resistance, field evaluation of level of resistance, behavior of adults and larvae, evaluation of host preference, adult survival and oviposition, foliage consumption and suitability for larval development. For most species, field colonization was low, feeding inhibition was high and suitability for development was low. It was concluded that there is some difference in the mode of resistance between the 7 Solanum species, the mode of resistance is not physical (leaf thickness or trichome density) and resistance results from the production of chemicals by the plants.

The objective of the work was to determine whether the chemicals responsible for resistance were located on the surface of the leaf or inside the leaf tissue and whether or not they were glycoalkaloids.

Three different types of extractions were performed; extraction of leaf surface chemicals, extraction of glycoalkaloids and an extraction of leaf tissue with hexane, chloroform and water. The 5 extract residues were used as treatments in feeding bioassays using adult females, fourth instar larvae and first instar larvae of the CPB. The extracts were applied at the same concentration as they occurred in the leaf. For adults and fourth instar larvae, 1 individual was placed in a cage (9cm Petri dish, lined with a damp filter paper) containing 4 treated leaf disks and there were 3 replications of 10 cages. For first instar larvae, 10 individuals were placed in a cage with 2 treated leaf disks and there were 3 replications of 7 cages. Bioassays were 24 hours long.

The major resistance factors for 5 of the 7 wild Solanum species were located in the water-soluble portion of the leaf tissue extracts. The exceptions were S. tarijense and S. capsicibaccatum. With these two species the results were inconsistent between insect growth stages.

For all the species except S. tarijense, it was decided to concentrate on the water-soluble portion of the leaf tissue extracts. Two fractionations were done. One used column chromatography to produce 6 fractions. The other used thin layer chromatography to produce 2 fractions, a phenolic fraction and a glycoalkaloid fraction. The fractions are being tested in feeding bioassays with first instar larvae. The results of these bioassays should contribute to a better understanding of the chemical nature of the resistance to the CPB of these wild Solanum species.

The Bees of Nova Scotia - Part A Cory S. Sheffield, AAFC - Kentville - Student Presentation

Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) are the most important pollinators of many plant species, including agricultural crops and wild flowers. As such, bees are keystone components of several agricultural and natural ecosystems, facilitating sexual reproduction within plant communities. Their activity therefore provides food directly to many forms of wild and domestic animal species, in addition to humans. Despite their importance, bee faunas traditionally receive little attention unless associated with important agricultural crops (i.e., lowbush blueberry and apple in Nova Scotia). The purpose of this presentation is to stress the importance of bees in all terrestrial ecosystems, discuss aspects of bee biology, and provide a summary of bees within the province of Nova Scotia.

Nova Scotia has 145 species of bees representing 27 genera from 6 families, as follows: COLLETIDAE - Colletes (9 species),Hylaeus (4 species); ANDRENIDAE - Andrena (38 species),Protandrena (1 species), Perdita (1 species), Calliopsis (1 species); HALICTIDAE - Augochlora(1 species), Augochlorella (1 species), Agapostemon (1 species), Halictus (3 spp.), Lasioglossum (31 species), Sphecodes (5 species); MELITTIDAE - Macropis (1 species); MEGACHILIDAE - Stelis(1 species), Coelioxys (5 species),Megachile (8 species plus 1 introduced), Hoplitis (3 species), Osmia (8 species plus 1 introduced); APIDAE - Ceratina (1 species),Nomada (6 species),Doeringiella (1 species), Epeolus (2 species), Melissodes (4 species), Anthophora (1 species),Bombus (10 species), Psithyrus (4 species), Apis (1 species).

The Bees of Nova Scotia - Part B Dick Rogers, Wildwood Labs, Kentville N.S.

Bee data is accumulating rapidly as researchers take on the challenge of investigating the biodiversity and environmental interactions of the group. As the volume of data on species classification, distribution, and hosts increases, there is a need to organize the information so it is more easily accessed and interpreted. Reational databases can provide the solution because a dbms can simplify data entry, check for data entry errors, reduce redundancy of data, and produce flexible and meaningful reports. The database presented here is a simple, flat file database that demonstrates a user-friendly interface for a distribution list of bee species. The database can easily be modified to take full advantage of the powerful relational capabilities of FileMaker Pro. Another beauty of the solution is that it can be bound for easy distribution, or it can be web enabled. To maximize the benefit of a fully developed bee database would require collaborative development and data contributions from all bee researchers. Such a database would make bee data more accessible to bee researchers and increase the value and knowledge obtained from the stored information.

General Ecology Section:

Evaluating the Ramp Pitfall Trap Sue Rigby, AAFC - Kentville, NS

This two year study evaluated the performance of a modified pitfall trap, dubbed the 'ramp trap', by comparing it with a standard pitfall trap. Ramp traps feature two attached ramps which provide access for ground traveling arthropods to a container resting on the substrate. The study was conducted to find if there are any capture differences and/or biases between ramp traps and standard pitfall traps. Using Carabidae as performance benchmarks, comparisons were made in capture numbers, species length, and species diversity. The study found that there were no significant differences in Carabidae captures between the trap types and that ramp traps performed equally with the standard pitfall traps.

Comparison of different methods of flow measurement used to characterize stream insect habitat. Eedy, R. and D.Giberson, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI C1A 4P3 - Student Presentation * Winner of the 2001 AES Presidents Prize*

The distribution and behaviour of benthic stream insects is strongly influenced by the force of water currents near the streambed (called near-bed flow). Near-bed flow is difficult to measure, and the accuracy of different methods varies among streams. We tested four different methods of evaluating near-bed flow in preparation for an upcoming study of benthic aquatic insects in a medium-sized section of the West River, Prince Edward Island. Each method of flow measurement was applied in 29 patches of stream (0.06 m2), selected to represent a wide range of flow conditions. To provide standard, reliable measurements of near-bed flow, we constructed velocity profiles (velocity measurements at different heights above a point on the streambed). Velocity profile measurements were compared to three less widely accepted types of flow measurements: 1) velocity at one height close to the streambed, 2) the movement of hemispheres with different densities, and 3) calculation of flow force from average streamflow and streambed shape. I will present results comparing measurements obtained using different methods, then discuss the practicality of each method for use in aquatic insect studies.

Stress monitoring in streams: genetic responses of black fly larvae as biological indicators Purcell, L., D. Giberson, and L. Hale, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI C1A 4P3 - Student Presentation

Land-use practises, such as agriculture or forestry, can influence stream ecosystem health through run-off of agricultural chemicals or erosion of sediment. Water chemical testing can indicate the concentration of certain elements and nutrients but gives no information on how organisms are responding. In the past, community-based studies have been used extensively to monitor organism response, but these studies are time-consuming and costly. Another method is to use biological stress markers. A visible stress response to heat, chemicals, and metals can be seen at genetically active areas on the polytene chromosomes of black fly larvae (Insecta: family Simuliidae), producing an enlarged region. These chromosome "puffs" can then be related to potentially stressful conditions. Black fly larvae were collected from streams receiving variable amounts of pesticide runoff on PEI to determine the utility of polytene chromosomes as biological stress markers. The larvae were fixed using Carnoy's solution and Feulgen stained. The salivary glands were removed and cells were digitally photographed for evaluation of chromosomes. The chromosomes of individuals from streams where there was a higher agricultural land use demonstrated an increased stress response compared to those with lower amounts of agriculture.

Discovery of a salt marsh caddisfly in PEI salt marshes. D. Giberson, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI C1A 4P3

Salt marshes are a common habitat type around much of the maritimes, and have a distinct but poorly known insect fauna, consisting mainly of Chironomidae (Diptera). During studies of insect emergence from several PEI salt marshes, adults of Limnephilus ademus (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae) were recorded emerging from the marshes in large numbers. Prior to this study, the larval habitat of L. ademus was not known, and caddisflies were not known to inhabit salt marshes in North America. The salt marsh pools where L. ademus were found are highly variable, with salinity conditions ranging from nearly fresh to seawater conditions or greater, and temperatures also fluctuate widely. In this paper, I will introduce you to the caddisfly and its habitat on PEI.



PROVINCIAL PEST UPDATES

Pest Update for Newfoundland

Compiled by

Peggy L. Dixon, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

St. John's, Newfoundland

and

Juanita R. Coady, Department of Forest Resources and Agrifoods

Corner Brook, Newfoundland

The main factor affecting insect populations this year has been the weather. In general, there was abundant snow cover (> 6 m in St. John's) through the winter, followed by a cool wet spring and a hot, extremely dry summer. This combination of weather seems to have favoured some species and been detrimental to others. Many of the common agricultural pests are fewer than usual, presumably due to the lack of rain. Exceptions include many of the Lepidoptera, such as the imported cabbageworm, Pieris rapae, and some of the cutworms. There are huge numbers of earwigs, mourning cloak butterflies (Nymphalis antiopa), the elm spanworm (Ennomos subsignaria) and the red admiral (Vanessa atalanta). The armyworm (Pseudaletia unipuncta), which devastated parts of the Maritimes this year, did not appear in Newfoundland or Labrador.

Other news:

Juanita Coady is the new Pest Management Specialist with the Department of Forest Resources and Agrifoods, replacing Goldie Porter who has moved to another Department. The position has been relocated from St. John's to Corner Brook.

Carolyn Parsons, who graduated from NSAC in the spring of 2001, will be starting an M.Sc. degree at Memorial University in September. Carolyn intends to study habitat manipulation as a cultural control method for the cabbage maggot. She has been awarded an NSERC fellowship and will be co-supervised by Peggy Dixon and Murray Colbo.

Recent articles in local newspapers continue to reflect the public's growing concern about pesticide use. Although focussed primarily on cosmetic use on lawns and in parks and playgrounds, this issue will no doubt expand to agriculture at some point. As professional entomologists this issue is something we should be thinking about.



Provincial Pest Update for PEI

Compiled by:

Rachael Cheverie, IPM Specialist PEIDAF

The winter of 2000-2001 was warmer than usual so we did not have a heavy frost before the first snowfall came. Because there was very little frost in the ground and more than adequate snow cover, 2001 has been a 'banner year' for bugs!

We suspect a number of insects overwintered that would normally not survive this far North. (ie armyworm, green peach aphid, etc...) There has been an abundance of insects this season.

Black flies and mosquitos appeared early in the spring and because of the heavy snow cover and subsequent melt there were many breeding areas across the province. These pest populations remained quite high right through July until the dry weather slowed things down.

There were also an abundance of ground beetles this year. The Agricultural Information Office was receiving up to 10 calls daily over a two week period from people who had ground beetle infestations in their homes.

There have also been a number of 'interesting' insects found this year. One carrot grower brought in a number of beautiful swallowtail butterfly caterpillars that were destroying one area of his field. Identification by Mary Smith and Christine Noronha at AAFC believe that this is a species that has never before been found in PEI. They are rearing the larvae out now to determine which species it is.

Now for the crop pests:

Cereals and Forages: (Peter Boswall - Field Crops Development Officer)

No one remembers a year when aphid numbers were as high and as widespread in cereals especially late planted cereals. This was perhaps weather related and the impact on yield appears to be difficult to separate from weather effects as well. However, while barley in the best early seeded fields averaged 1.4 - 1.5 tonnes per acre, later planted barley is only approaching 1.1 -1.2 tonnes per acre test weights in later grain are also lighter. Could half the yield difference be due to aphids? The demo plots at the research station were planted late and sprayed early for aphids it will be interesting to see how they yield in comparison to other late seeded cereals.

Armyworms!! Their impact was felt in their potential to affect grain yields and in the destruction caused to under-seeded forage and to a much lesser extent on pastures. The province began a monitoring program in early June to trap adult moths to determine which areas may be affected by armyworm this season. We set out traps in all the areas with high infestations in 2000. Peak trap numbers were reached on the 3rd week of June and armyworm larvae started to appear in grain crops by the 10th of July. We suspect that armyworm did overwinter in PEI last year and if current global warming trends continue this might become a more 'frequent' pest in this region. Any further appearance could see some of the growers that had a problem the past three seasons move towards tramlines to facilitate spraying as a large percentage of the crop was unharvestable due to the number of sprayer tracks in the field.

Potatoes:

We are seeing all of the 'usual suspects' in potato fields this year but perhaps in higher numbers in some areas of the province. Many growers across the province have switched to Admire in-furrow insecticide and so had little problems with Colorado potato beetle, potato flea beetle, or aphids. However they did see an increase in European cornborer damage as this product does not affect cornborer and in the past, spraying for Colorado's with some of the OP's and Carbamates often coincided with cornborer infestations so a second spray was not often needed. In most fields that didn't have admire infurrow, Colorado potato beetle populations were very high and growers had a hard job trying to keep them controlled.

A number of organic growers released Podius sp. eggs in an attempt to control Colorado potato beetle populations since they are no longer able to purchase Bt in Canada. Results have not been compiled yet but only a few of the Podius adults have actually been seen feeding on CPB larvae in the field.

We also saw a fairly large number of fields affected by potato leafhopper this year which is only an occasional pest on the island. We assume this is because of the hot dry weather we had throughout the month of July.

We are also seeing a large number of fields affected by tarnished plant bug this year and again this is usually seen during hot dry summers.

Potato yields will be down significantly this year but it is more likely due to the drought conditions rather than insect damage.

Fruit Crops: (Chris Jordan - Small Fruit Crop Development Officer)

Blueberries - fruit fly (blueberry maggot) - imp. for processing industry

Apples - Red Mites and spring feeding caterpillars, all orchards used pheromone disruption for codling moth control. And Apple maggot populations were similar to other years.

Cranberries - No major pest outbreaks but there was not a lot of monitoring done this year. Had one grower complaining of aphid infestation in his bog and another with strawberry root weevil larvae doing some damage.

Raspberries / Strawberries - I haven't seen / heard of any major problems.

Vegetable Crops:

Lettuce - a number of calls about aphids and tarnished plant bug damage

Cole crops - Early in the season populations of root maggots and diamond back moths seemed to be on average with other years. Drought is the biggest challenge this year and a lot of fields have been disced under due to lack of moisture so insects have been the least of their worries.


Pest Update: Insects on Agricultural Crops in
New Brunswick, July 2000 to August 2001

Christopher Maund, IPM Specialist (Entomologist)

New Brunswick Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture

Agriculture Development Branch

Integrated Pest Management Section

P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

chris.maund@gnb.ca

Introduction

The following is an update on relevant insect and related pest activity affecting agricultural crops in NB from July 200 to August 2001.

Small Fruit

Lowbush Blueberry (2001): Two thousand hectares were treated for control of the blueberry flea beetle, Altica sylvia Malloch, in northeastern NB.

The blueberry leaf beetle, Pyrrhalta vaccinii (Fall), which is typically a very minor pest of blueberries in NB, was at unusually very high population levels in parts of southeastern and northeastern NB in May and June. Adult beetles caused obvious signs of skeletonized leaf damage, which was generally restricted to one to two metres of blueberry field edges adjacent to a forested area.

Strawberry (2001): High populations of twospotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae Koch, were reported by various growers.

Tree Fruit

Apple (2001): There have been some positive results with the attempt to use predatory mites for the control of twospotted spider mites and European red mites, Panonychus ulmi (Koch), in apple orchards in NB. Two growers have eliminated the use of summer miticides in two orchards. It is hopeful that, in time, populations of beneficial mites will increase in the other test-site orchards. The sites in NB are part of a larger study, directed by entomologists from Nova Scotia.

Sites were set up in NB for codling moth control studies. Trials were set up for the control of codling moths with Last CallTM. Preliminary information is yielding positive results, as captures of codling moths on pheromone traps were lower in blocks treated with Last CallTM compared to untreated (control) blocks. These NB sites are also part of a larger study, directed by entomologists from Nova Scotia.

Vegetables

Potato (2001): Aphid populations have been low, but are starting to develop rapidly in some fields. Flea beetles have not been a problem, so far. Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), populations have been low.

Other Vegetables (2001): Tarnished plant bugs, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), became more of a problem on various crops in late July.

Grain crops (2001): Approximately 25,000 acres were treated for control of the armyworm, Mythimna unipuncta (Haworth), (synonym: Pseudaletia unipuncta (Haworth). Approximately 80% of this acreage was barley, with the remainder being wheat. This was the second year of the armyworm infestation. In 2000: Approximately 1000 acres of grain crops had been infested by the armyworm.

Forage crops (2001): Approximately 5,000 acres (pastures) were treated for control of the armyworm, M. unipuncta. In 2000: Approximately 5,800 to 7,000 acres had been infested by the armyworm.

Insect Identifications

Noteworthy 2001 samples (up to August):

There was a report of "hundreds" of spiders on the outside of a house. The spider was identified as an orb weaver, Araneus sp. There were reports of higher than usual populations of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), caterpillars in southern NB. There were a few reports of large numbers of root weevils, Otiorhynchus spp., invading houses. There were reports of numerous green weevils from northern NB, suspected to be Polydrusus sericeus (Schall.), as this was the species identified in previous year's samples. Numerous telephone calls were received regarding armyworms infesting lawns, which did not occur last year. There was a report of large numbers of adult yellow mealworm beetles, Tenebrio molitor L., in hay. There was a separate report of large numbers of these beetles invading a house. The Essex skipper, Thymelius lineola (Ochsenheimer), was reported from a grain field. The fourlined plant bug, Poecilocapsus lineatus (Fabricius), was reported to be feeding on potato plants. Leaf beetles, Calligrapha sp., were reported to have defoliated 50% of the leaf surface area of dogwood trees.

Noteworthy samples from 2000 (July onwards):

The back yard of a house was overrun by a large population of ground beetles, Harpalus rufipes (De Geer). Weevils, tentatively identified as Philopedon plagiatum (Schaller), were reported to have infested snap bean plants. A few instances of large numbers of root weevils, Otiorhynchus spp., were reported from homeowners. Hairy chinch bugs, Blissus leucopterus hirtus Montandon, were a problem in lawns. High populations of alder flea beetle larvae, Altica ambiens alni Harrison, were reported on alders throughout large areas of the southern part of the province. The large flour beetle, Tribolium destructor Uyttenboogaart, was received from a grocery store in Halifax. A high population (apparently hundreds) of the chainspotted geometer moth, Cingilia catenaria (Drury), was reported from York county. Hundreds of small dung flies (Sphaeroceridae) were reported to occur in various rooms in a newly-constructed house. (These flies have been reported to inhabit insulation material prior to it being used for insulating walls.)


Acadian Entomological Society 61st Annual Business Meeting

Friday August 24th, 2001 9:30 - 10:30 AM

Duffy Science Building, UPEI,

Charlottetown, PEI

  • Call to Order (9:30AM) - President Rachael Cheverie

  • 2000 Minutes

  • Business Arising from the Minutes: -1999 minutes (deferred from last years business meeting

  • Presidents Report

  • Financial Report

  • Committee Reports

  • New Business:

    - 2001-2003 Executive (Maine)

- ESC Representative

- Joint ESC/AES meeting for 2004

- Other business

  • Adjourn


Acadian Entomological Society

61st Annual Business Meeting

UPEI Charlottetown. PEI

The 61st annual meeting of the Acadian Entomological society was held on August 24th, 2001 at the University of Prince Edward Island in Charlottetown P.E.I. The meeting was called to order by president Rachael Cheverie at 9:50 am. Minutes were recorded by Christine Noronha.

The agenda was accepted as presented, approved by Donna Giberson and seconded Gilles Boiteau.

2000 minutes: Attention was brought to some spelling errors in the 2000 minutes which were noted and corrected.

1999 minutes: Rachael informed those present that she had still not received the minutes from the 1999 meeting. She had found out from Peggy Dixon that the person responsible had changed positions so it was unlikely that those minutes would ever be received.

Mailing list: The mailing list (e-mail) had been updated and the proceedings for the 2001 meeting would be e-mailed to all those on the list.

Website: Donna Giberson set up a new AES website and will be responsible for maintaining and updating the site. The membership list and names of the new executive will be on the new site.

The minutes were approved by Shiyou Li and seconded by Gary Halloway

Presidents report

A copy of the president's report is attached.

Financial report:

Christine Noronha gave the financial report. An updated report reflecting all conference fees and expenditures is attached. Membership stands at 23.

Committee Reports:

None of the committees were active at that time.

A suggestion to keep all society material from past conferences and activities at a central location instead of shipping them to a new location every two years was made. It was decided that all material will be shipped to J.P Lablanc to be archived.

New Business:

2001-2003 meeting:

The next meeting will be held in Maine. July 21-23 were proposed as the tentative dates.

ESC Representative:

Donna Giberson agreed to be the AES representative at the 2002 ESC meeting in Manitoba.

Joint ESC/AES meeting 2004:

It was suggested that although the AES executive will be in New Brunswick the joint meeting should be held in Charlottetown. A committee on PEI will be in charge of all local arrangements with the NB executive in charge of the scientific program followed by a discussion. Gilles Boiteau offered to take the suggestion to the NB executive for further discussion.

Other business:

The best time to hold these meeting was further discussed. Late July to early August was preferred by most. It was decided that this decision should be left up to the organizing committee.

Donna Giberson moved to adjourn the meeting seconded by Shiyou Li.

The meeting adjourned at 11:15 am.

Presidents Report

It's hard to believe that it's already the end of my term as President of the Acadian Entomological Society. It has been an interesting and challenging couple of years and I've learned a lot in a short amount of time. I took this responsibility on 'blindly' and but would like to say that it's been a real pleasure to be involved in such a successful organization with such a diverse and dedicated membership.

I would like to express my gratitude to the rest of our AES executive, Drs. Donna Giberson and Christine Noronha. They have put a lot of hard work and effort into organizing this meeting and have been extremely generous with their time and support.

Finally I wish my colleagues in Maine every success in hosting the next AES meeting and I look forward to seeing you all there next year.

Kindest Regards,

Rachael Cheverie




ACADIAN ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY FINANCIAL REPORT

January 11, 2001 January 10, 2002

INCOMING

Balance forwarded 2843.82

Membership ... 280.00

Registration . .. 945.13

Sub-total 4068.89

EXPENDITURES

Conference Supplies 57.95

Reception 324.42

Banquet ... 660.00

Student Award 100.00

Gift Keynote Speaker 42.76

Sub-total 1184.45

Balance 2884.44

OTHER

Bank charges for cheques 5. 25

Interest .14

TOTAL BALANCE 2879.33

OTHER ASSETS

GIC (Toronto Dominion Bank, PEI) . 4359.09


BY-LAWS OF THE ACADIAN ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY

(Including Amendments passed at the 60th Annual Meeting, June 22nd, 2000)

1. Name

The name of the Society shall be the "Acadian Entomological Society".

2. Affiliation

The Society shall be affiliated with the incorporated Entomological Society of Canada in accordance with the constitutional by-laws of that society.

3. Objects

To bring about a close association of entomologists and those interested in entomology in the four Atlantic provinces and the neighbouring New England States, and to cooperate with and to support the incorporated Entomological Society of Canada.

4. Membership

4.1 Regular Member

Anyone interested in the objects of the Society shall be eligible for regular membership.

4.2 Honorary Member

(a) Election of honorary members shall be effected as follows: Nomination by at least three members of the Society in good standing and submitted for consideration to the membership committee which will pass to a general meeting of the society those names which meet with their unanimous approval. Election shall be by secret ballot, requiring 75%of the members present at a general meeting.

(b) Nominators shall submit with the nomination a description of the qualifications of the nominee sufficient to inform the membership committee and the general meeting of complete basis for the nomination. The nominee shall be selected from the ranks of those who have made outstanding contributions to entomology, particularly in the Atlantic Region. Although no rigid number of honorary members is set, the honour shall be bestowed upon a conservative number of individuals.

( c) Honorary members are not required to pay dues but may also become regular members if they desire voting privileges.

(d) An honorary president may be elected from the honorary membership list. Election to this office will follow the same procedure as that required for initial honorary membership.

5. Dues

Dues shall be ten dollars ($10.00) per year for a Regular Member and six dollars ($6.00) per year for student members unless otherwise decided by a two thirds majority vote at a meeting of the membership or by letter ballot.

5.1 Dues shall be due and payable on the first day of January in each year. Members who have not paid their dues within the first four months of the financial year for which they are payable shall be dropped from the membership.

5.2 Members of the Acadian Entomological Society shall pay the prescribed dues to the Secretary-Treasurer of the Acadian Entomological Society.

6. Financial Year

The financial year of the Society shall be the calendar year.

6.1 Not later than 31 December, the President shall appoint an auditor from the membership to audit the accounts of the Society.

7. Executive

The affairs of the Society shall be managed by an executive consisting of the President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, immediate past-President and the Acadian Entomological Society representative to the Board of Directors of the Entomological Society of Canada.

7.1 The President and Vice-President shall be elected in odd numbered years and shall hold office for two years or until their successors are elected. The newly elected officers shall take office following the completion of business at the annual meeting.

7.2 The representative to the Board of Directors of the incorporated Entomological Society of Canada shall be nominated in an election year at a meeting of the Society or by mail ballot. The term to be for three years.

7.3 The Secretary-Treasurer shall be appointed by the President for the presidential term of office.

8. Election

Elections shall be held every odd numbered year at a meeting of the membership. Every odd numbered year shall be termed the election.

8.1 The president shall appoint a nominating committee of three members two months before the meeting of the election year. This committee shall secure a member's permission before proposing his name for office, and shall submit one or more names for each office. The retiring President shall be a nominee for the office of Representative on the Board of Directors of the incorporated Entomological Society of Canada, providing he is a member of good standing of the latter Society and is able to act.

8.2 The nominating committee shall submit a slate of officers at the meeting of the election year.

8.3 The retiring Secretary/Treasurer shall send the results of the election to the Secretary of the incorporated Entomological Society of Canada.

9. Meeting of the Membership

The executive may call annual meetings of the membership but shall always hold a meeting of the membership during the election year. The annual meeting of the Society shall normally be held during the month of April, but may be changed for any year at the discretion of the Executive.

9.1 Ten paid up members at a duly called meeting shall constitute a quorum.

9.2 A report on the meeting of the membership shall be prepared by and retained in the files of the Secretary/Treasurer. A copy shall be sent to each member.

10. Standing Committees

The newly elected president shall appoint a chairman to each of the following standing committees:

10.1 Membership Committee

The membership committee shall consist of three members appointed by the president plus the Secretary/Treasurer as Chairman. The Committee shall represent the Atlantic Provinces geographically and shall be guided by the procedures recommended by the Membership Committee of the Entomological Society of Canada and shall cooperate with that Committee.

10.2 Archives Committee

The Library Committee consists of four members appointed by the President. The Committee shall represent the Atlantic Provinces geographically and shall collect articles, reprints and books by members and former members and articles, reports, and books about entomology in the region and care for them in a library or archives.

10.3 Pest Management Committee

The Pest Management Committee consists of three members appointed by the President. The Committee shall represent the Atlantic Provinces geographically. The function of the committee is to provide opinions on pest management matters in the name of the Society to the general public and handle such other pest management related duties as requested by the President.

10.4 The Committee shall consist of three members appointed by the President. The committee shall consider and implement means of generating entomological interest in students. The Chairman may be representative of the Society of the Public Education Commitee of the Entomological Society of Canada. The representative to the Board of Directors of the incorporated Entomological Society of Canada may be one of the three members appointed to this Committee. The executive shall decide whether a student oral paper competition will be held at the annual meeting and appoint a regular member to organize it. The guidelines for elegibility of students are that they must be enrolled as an undergraduate or graduate student at the time of the annual meeting. A letter signed by their advisor or major professor must be submitted to the member organizer prior to the annual meeting. The winner of the student competition (determined by an ad-hoc committee of AES members) will receive a certificate and $100.00 (in the currency of the host country). Other student participants will receive a certificate of participation.

11. Amendments of By-Laws

The by-laws may be replaced or amended by a two-thirds majority vote of a quorum

either at a meeting or by letter ballot.



Annual Meetings and Principal Officers

Nova Scotia Entomological Society

Acadian Entomological Society 1915-2001

Year Date Place President V.President Secretary
NOVA SCOTIA ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY
1915 Aug 4 Truro E.C. Allen L.A. DeWolfe W.H.Brittain
1916 Aug. 4 Truro E.C. Allen L.A. DeWolfe W.H.Brittain
1917 Aug. 2 Truro L.A. Dewolf G.E. Sanders W.H.Brittain
1918 July 26 Truro L.A. Dewolf G.E. Sanders W.H.Brittain
1919 July 31 Truro W.H. Brittain J.D. Tothill A. Kelsall
1920 Aug. 24th Wolfville W.H. Brittain J.D. Tothill A.G. Dustan
ACADIAN ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY
1922 March 9-10 St. John's W. MacIntosh W.H. Brittain A.B. Baird
1922 Dec. 14 Amherst W. MacIntosh W.H. Brittain A.B. Baird
1923 Dec. 12 Amherst J.D. Tothill J.P. Spittail W.E. Whitehead
1925 April 21 Ann. Royal J.P. Spittail G.P. Walker W.E. Whitehead
1950 March 28-29 Fredericton D.D. Pond R. Frank Morris R.S. Forbes
1951 April 5-6 Fredericton D.D. Pond R. Frank Morris R.S. Forbes
1952 April 15-16 Kentville A.D. Pickett F.T. Lord R.S. Forbes
1953 April 15 Debert A.D. Pickett A.W. MacPhee M.E. Neary
1954 April 7-8 Charlottetown F.M. Cannon R.F. Morris F.L. McEwen
1955 Oct. 21 Fredericton F.M. Cannon R.F. Morris J.E. Arsenault
1956 April 19-20 Charlottetown C.A. Miller G.T. Morgan M. MacGillivray
1957 April 24-25 Fredericton C.A. Miller G.T. Morgan M. MacGillivray
1958 April 22-23 Kentville C.J.S. Fox C.R. MacLellan N.A. Patterson
1959 April 7-8 Truro C.J.S. Fox C.R. MacLellan N.A. Patterson
1960 April 5-6 Fredericton F.E. Webb W.T.A. Neilson D.C. Eidt
1961 April 11-12 Fredericton W.T.A. Neilson - D.C. Eidt
1962 April 10-11 Charlottetown D.C. Read W.A. Shands L.S. Thompson
1963 April 17-18 Orono D.C. Read W.A. Shands L.S. Thompson
1964 April 21-22 Fredericton I.W. Varty J.B. Adams G. Underwood
1965 Sept 1-3 Fredericton I.W. Varty J.B. Adams G. Underwood
1966 Aug. 31 - Sept 1 Kentville N.A. Patterson M.E. Neary C.R. MacLellan
1967 April 12-13 Kentville N.A. Patterson M.E. Neary C.R. MacLellan
1968 Aug. 5-7 St. John's R.F. Morris G.L. Warren C.R. MacLellan
1969 Aug. 5-7 Orono R.F. Morris G.L. Warren C.R. MacLellan
1970 Sept 1-3 Fredericton M.MacGillivray G.L. Wood W.D. Seabrook
1971 April 5-7 Fredericton M.MacGillivray G.L. Wood W.D. Seabrook
1972 May 2-3 Bangor J.B. Diamond R.H. Storch E.A. Osgood
1973 April 3-5 Orono J.B. Diamond R.H. Storch E.A. Osgood
1974 Aug. 26-29 Halifax R.L. Horsburgh A.W. MacPhee H.J. Herbert
1975 April 7-9 Kentville A.W. MacPhee - H.J. Herbert
1977 May 3-4 Fredericton E.G. Kettela M.M. Neilson M. Cameron
1978 April 4-5 Orono R.H. Storch B. Wright K.E. Gibbs
1979 May 9-10 Bangor R.H. Storch B. Wright K.E. Gibbs
1980 May 14-15 Kentville C.R. MacLellan H.B. Specht H.J. Herbert
1981 April 8-9 Kentville C.R. MacLellan H.B. Specht H.J. Herbert
1982 April 19-20 Fredericton G.W. Wood R.H. Parry G. Boiteau
1983 April 18-20 Fredericton G.W. Wood R.H. Parry G. Boiteau
1984 Oct. 1 St. Andrews D.J. Larson A.G. Raske K.P. Lim
1985 Aug. 5-8 St. John's D.J. Larson A.G. Raske K.P. Lim
1986 April 28-30 Bangor E.A. Osgood D.F. Mairs M. Houseweart
1987 Aug. 18-19 Charlottetown E.A. Osgood D.F. Mairs M. Houseweart
1988 May 24-26 Bible Hill J. Finney-Crawley H.B. Specht W.W. Bowers
1989 Oct. 2-4 St. John's J. Finney-Crawley H.B. Specht W.W. Bowers
1990 April 18-20 Fredericton G. Boiteau C. Nigam S.B.N. Smith
1991 July 30-31 Fredericton G. Boiteau C. Nigam S.B.N. Smith
1992 July 27-29 Charlottetown J.G. Stewart B. Craig L. Hale
1993 June 21-23 Charlottetown J.G. Stewart B. Craig L. Hale
1994 July 17-19 Campobello K.E. Gibbs E. Groden F.A. Drummond
1995 June 25-27 Campobello K.E. Gibbs E. Groden F.A. Drummond
1996 Oct. 5-9 Fredericton R.F. Smith L. Crozier E. Bent
1997 Aug. 10-12 Kentville R.F. Smith L. Crozier E. Bent
1998 Aug 13-15 Deer Lake L. Hollet P.L. Dixon K. Ryan
1999 Aug Deer Lake L. Hollet P.L. Dixon K. Ryan
2000 June 21-22 Charlottetown R.M.Cheverie J.G. Stewart D. Leblanc
2001 August 22-24 Charlottetown R.M. Cheverie D. Giberson C. Noronha
2002 Maine A. Aloykin C. Gibbs C. Donahue


Honorary Members of the Acadian Entomological Society

F.M. Cannon - Charlottetown, PEI

D. Eidt - Fredericton, N.B.

M.E. MacGillivray - Fredericton, N.B.

C.R. MacLellan - Kentville, N.S.

R.F. Morris - St. John's, Nfld

D.C. Read - Charlottetown, PEI

W. Shands - Salem, SC, USA

G.W. Simpson - Orono, ME, USA

V.R. Vickery - Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Que.



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